Pealkiri: 

Prevalence of alcohol-related pathologies at autopsy: Estonian Forensic Study of Alcohol and Premature Death

Autorid: Tuusov J, Lang K, Väli M, Pärna K, Tõnisson M, Ringmets I, McKee M, Helander A, Leon DA
Väljaandja/tellija: Addiction
Märksõnad: alkoholitarbimine, lahang, kohtuarstid, kohtumeditsiin, surmapõhjused
Välja antud: 2014
Tüüp: Teaduslik artikkel/kogumik
Viide: Tuusov J,Lang K, Väli M, et. Prevalence of alcohol-related pathologies at autopsy: Estonian Forensic Study of Alcohol and Premature Death. Addiction 2014;109(12)
Alamvaldkonnad:Sõltuvusainete tarvitamine
Kirjeldus: Alcohol can induce diverse serious pathologies, yet this complexity may be obscured when alcohol-related deaths are classified according to a single underlying cause. We sought to quantify this issue and its implications for analysing mortality data.
Potentially alcohol-related pathologies were identified following macroscopic and histological examination. Alcohol biomarkers levels were determined. For a subset (26%), drinking behaviour was provided by next-of-kin. The Estonian Statistics Office provided underlying cause of death.
Most deaths (75%) showed evidence of potentially alcohol-related pathologies, and 32% had pathologies in two or more organs. The liver was most commonly affected [60.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI)=56.3-64.6] followed by the lungs (18.6%, 95% CI=15.4-22.1), stomach (17.5%, 95% CI=14.4-20.9), pancreas (14.1%, 95% CI=11.3-17.3), heart (4.9%, 95% CI=3.2-7.0) and oesophagus (1.4%, 95% CI=0.6-2.8). Only a minority with liver pathology had a second pathology. The number of pathologies correlated with alcohol biomarkers (phosphatidylethanol, gamma-glytamyl transpeptidase in blood, ethylglucuronide, ethylsulphate in urine). Despite the high prevalence of liver pathology, few deaths had alcoholic liver disease specified as the underlying cause.
The majority of 554 men aged 25-54 undergoing forensic autopsy in Estonia in 2008-09 showed evidence of alcohol-related pathology. However, the recording of deaths by underlying cause failed to capture the scale and nature of alcohol-induced pathologies found.