Pealkiri: 

Suicide methods in Europe - A gender specific analyses of countries participating in the "European Alliance Against Depression"

Autorid: Värnik A , Kõlves K , van der Feltz-Cornelis C , Marusic A , Oskarsson H , Palmer A , Reisch T , Scheerder G , Arensman E , Aromaa E , Giupponi G , Gusmao R , Maxwell M , Pull C , Szekely A , Sola VP , Hegerl U
Väljaandja/tellija: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Märksõnad: Euroopa, suitsiidid, mehed, naised, vaimne tervis
Välja antud: 2008
Tüüp: Teaduslik artikkel/kogumik
Viide: Värnik A, Kõlves K, van der Feltz-Cornelis C, et al. Suicide methods in Europe - A gender specific analyses of countries participating in the "European Alliance Against Depression" . Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 2008;62:545-51.
Link: http://jech.bmj.com/content/62/6/545.abstract
Alamvaldkonnad:Vaimne tervis
Kirjeldus: Objective: To identify the most frequent gender-specific suicide methods in Europe.
Design: Proportions of seven predominant suicide methods utilised in 16 countries participating in the European Alliance Against Depression (EAAD) were reported in total and cross-nationally. Relative risk (RR) relating to suicide methods and gender was calculated. To group countries by pattern of suicide methods, hierarchical clustering was applied.
Setting and participants: Data on suicide methods for 119 122 male and 41 338 female cases in 2000-4/5 from 16 EAAD countries, covering 52% of European population were obtained.
Results: Hanging was the most prevalent suicide method among both males (54.3%) and females (35.6%). For males, hanging was followed by firearms (9.7%) and poisoning by drugs (8.6%); for females, by poisoning by drugs (24.7%) and jumping from a high place (14.5%). Only in Switzerland did hanging rank as second for males after firearms. Hanging ranked first among females in eight countries, poisoning by drugs in five and jumping from a high place in three. In all countries, males had a higher risk than females of using firearms and hanging and a lower risk of poisoning by drugs, drowning and jumping. Grouping showed that countries might be divided into five main groups among males; for females, grouping did not yield clear results.
Conclusions: Research on suicide methods could lead to the development of gender-specific intervention strategies. Nevertheless, other approaches, such as better identification and treatment of mental disorders and the improvement of toxicological aid should be put in place.